PRESENTATION VIDEOS 2018 & 2019

SEPTEMBER 2019

Ginessa J. Mahar, Phd, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida


Ethnoarchaeology of Ancient Fishing Practices: Insights from the Florida Gulf Coast

September Lecture: Ethnoarchaeology of Ancient Fishing Practices: Insights from the Florida Gulf Coast

CGCAS/AWIARE Archaeology Lecture Series:Ethnoarchaeology of Ancient Fishing Practices: Insights from the Florida Gulf CoastGinessa J. Mahar, Phd, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of FloridaMillions of people venture out into Florida’s coastal waters each year to take part in an ancient practice: fishing. Whether for commercial or recreational purposes fishing has deep roots in the region - thousands of years deep. That Florida's ancient inhabitants have benefited from these bountiful coastal waters for over ten thousand years is not surprising. Coastal archaeological sites throughout the state are loaded with the remains of fish familiar to local fishing enthusiasts: mullet, red drum, seatrout, sheepshead and more. But while archaeologists have been able to identify what fishes ancient fisherfolk were catching, they have not been able to discern how they were catching them. Until recently.Ethnoarchaeology is the study of living human practices to understand past human actions and archaeological materials. Methods like this are often used when archaeological investigations leave researchers with more questions than answers. This presentation tacks back and forth through time—over two thousand years—on a quest to better understand the knowledge, practices, and technologies of Florida's ancient fisherfolk.Ginessa Mahar completed her Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Florida. Her dissertation research involves the investigation of coastal fishing communities that thrived along the shores of the North Florida Gulf Coast during the Woodland period. Mahar specifically focuses on the fluorescence of civic-ceremonial centers and how fishing technologies and practices developed to facilitate the large gatherings that brought distant communities together at these sacred sites.

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 19 September 2019

Millions of people venture out into Florida’s coastal waters each year to take part in an ancient practice: fishing. Whether for commercial or recreational purposes fishing has deep roots in the region - thousands of years deep. That Florida's ancient inhabitants have benefited from these bountiful coastal waters for over ten thousand years is not surprising. Coastal archaeological sites throughout the state are loaded with the remains of fish familiar to local fishing enthusiasts: mullet, red drum, seatrout, sheepshead and more. But while archaeologists have been able to identify what fishes ancient fisherfolk were catching, they have not been able to discern how they were catching them. Until recently.

Ethnoarchaeology is the study of living human practices to understand past human actions and archaeological materials. Methods like this are often used when archaeological investigations leave researchers with more questions than answers. This presentation tacks back and forth through time—over two thousand years—on a quest to better understand the knowledge, practices, and technologies of Florida's ancient fisherfolk.

Ginessa Mahar completed her Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Florida. Her dissertation research involves the investigation of coastal fishing communities that thrived along the shores of the North Florida Gulf Coast during the Woodland period. Mahar specifically focuses on the fluorescence of civic-ceremonial centers and how fishing technologies and practices developed to facilitate the large gatherings that brought distant communities together at these sacred sites.

FEBRUARY 2019

Ben Bilgri, Archaeological Field Technician


History Washing Away: The Archaeological Past and Future of Egmont Key

History Washing Away: The Archaeological Past and Future of Egmont Key

History Washing Away: The Archaeological Past and Future of Egmont KeyBen Bilgri, M.A.Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Tribal Historic Preservation OfficeEgmont Key spent most of its existence as an unremarkable, uninhabited sand island at the mouth of Tampa Bay, visited by the indigenous inhabitants of Florida only occasionally as a temporary fishing stop. But over the course of the last 170 years, this small landmass experienced an intensity of occupation that belied its sleepy early history. Variously utilized as a lighthouse station, a concentration camp for Seminole prisoners of war, a fortified military installation, and a wildlife refuge, Egmont Key represents an archaeological site with the potential to illuminate several different eras of American history. A fortuitous wildfire in 2016 allowed Tribal archaeologists to perform a preliminary survey of the island, and artifacts likely dating to the time of the Seminole internment were recovered. However, Egmont Key has lost more than half of its land area over the last century, and environmental threats to the island itself represent significant challenges for the future.

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 21 February 2019

Egmont Key spent most of its existence as an unremarkable, uninhabited sand island at the mouth of Tampa Bay, visited by the indigenous inhabitants of Florida only occasionally as a temporary fishing stop. But over the course of the last 170 years, this small landmass experienced an intensity of occupation that belied its sleepy early history. Variously utilized as a lighthouse station, a concentration camp for Seminole prisoners of war, a fortified military installation, and a wildlife refuge, Egmont Key represents an archaeological site with the potential to illuminate several different eras of American history. A fortuitous wildfire in 2016 allowed Tribal archaeologists to perform a preliminary survey of the island, and artifacts likely dating to the time of the Seminole internment were recovered. However, Egmont Key has lost more than half of its land area over the last century, and environmental threats to the island itself represent significant challenges for the future.

Ben Bilgri, M.A., RPA, works as an Archaeological Field Technician with the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office. He has nearly 15 years of experience working on a wide variety of projects throughout the American Southeast. His personal research interests include the study of depositional patterns at battlefields and other military archaeological sites.

JANUARY 2019

Charles Cobb, Florida Museum of Natural History


The Rocky Road from Tampa to Chicasa: Hernando de Soto’s Tribulations in the Interior Southeast

CGCAS/AWIARE January 2019 Lecture: The Rocky Road from Tampa to Chicasa: Hernando de Soto’s Tribulations in the Interior Southeast

The Rocky Road from Tampa to Chicasa: Hernando de Soto’s Tribulations in the Interior SoutheastCharles Cobb, Florida Museum of Natural HistoryThe beginnings of the journey of the members of the Hernando de Soto expedition were fairly auspicious. They encountered sizable and prosperous chiefdoms ranging from Florida through Georgia and the Carolinas, and by virtue of size and military technology were able to fend off hostilities from Native Americans. Their fortunes turned soured, however, in 1540 and 1541 as major conflicts at Mabila (Alabama) and Chicasa (Mississippi) left scores of Spaniards dead and wounded, as well as major losses of pigs, horses, and equipment. Recent investigations at the Stark Farm site in eastern Mississippi have yielded a large number of likely sixteenth-century Spanish metal artifacts (e.g., adzes, axes, horse shoes) that seem to be related to the Soto encounter at Chicasa. This presentation considers the possibility of whether the Stark Farm is actually Chicasa, as well as alternative hypotheses to account for presence of European material at this location. Charles Cobb is Curator and Lockwood Professor of Historical Archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. He specializes in the archaeology and history of the southeastern United States, and has a particular interest in Native American engagements with European colonialism. He has been involved in sustained research on Indian towns on the Carolina frontier. In a collaborative project with the Chickasaw Nation, Cobb is exploring the complex interactions between the Chickasaw, English and French in colonial era Mississippi. With National Endowment for the Humanities funding, he also is leading a team in the development of an online database on the archaeology of Franciscan missions.

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 17 January 2019

The beginnings of the journey of the members of the Hernando de Soto expedition were fairly auspicious. They encountered sizable and prosperous chiefdoms ranging from Florida through Georgia and the Carolinas, and by virtue of size and military technology were able to fend off hostilities from Native Americans. Their fortunes turned soured, however, in 1540 and 1541 as major conflicts at Mabila (Alabama) and Chicasa (Mississippi) left scores of Spaniards dead and wounded, as well as major losses of pigs, horses, and equipment. Recent investigations at the Stark Farm site in eastern Mississippi have yielded a large number of likely sixteenth-century Spanish metal artifacts (e.g., adzes, axes, horse shoes) that seem to be related to the Soto encounter at Chicasa. This presentation considers the possibility of whether the Stark Farm is actually Chicasa, as well as alternative hypotheses to account for presence of European material at this location.

Charles Cobb is Curator and Lockwood Professor of Historical Archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. He specializes in the archaeology and history of the southeastern United States, and has a particular interest in Native American engagements with European colonialism. He has been involved in sustained research on Indian towns on the Carolina frontier. In a collaborative project with the Chickasaw Nation, Cobb is exploring the complex interactions between the Chickasaw, English and French in colonial era Mississippi. With National Endowment for the Humanities funding, he also is leading a team in the development of an online database on the archaeology of Franciscan missions.

SEPTEMBER 2018

Professor Thomas J. Pluckhahn, University of South Florida


New Histories of Village Life at Crystal River

NEW HISTORIES OF VILLAGE LIFE AT CRYSTAL RIVER by Dr. Thomas Pluckhahn

CGCAS September 2018 Archaeology Talk: NEW HISTORIES OF VILLAGE LIFE AT CRYSTAL RIVER by Dr. Thomas Pluckhahn, USF Department of Anthropology

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 20 September 2018

Today, more than half of the earth’s 7 billion people live in cities, and we take the benefits—and challenges—of urban life as a given. But the vast majority of human history was lived in communities of much smaller size. For social and biological scientists, the decision our ancestors made to begin living in larger communities is part of the larger puzzle of the evolution of cooperation: why and how did individuals choose to subsume their self-interests to those of larger social groups?

The transition to village life began some 10,000 years ago in the Middle East. In eastern North America, villages became common in the Woodland period, from around 1000 BC to AD 1050. Among the more prominent of these was the village that developed at the famous Crystal River site, north of Tampa. Recent research at Crystal River contributes to our understanding of the way villages form, grow, and eventually dissolve.

Dr. Pluckhahn recently published Histories of Village Life at Crystal River (2018)

APRIL 2018

Willet A. Boyer III, Ph.D. - Aucilla Research Institute


De Soto Slept Here, Not There: The Archaeology of Early Contact and Missions Sites in Northern Central Florida and the Making and Exposure of an Archaeological Hoax

Part One

CGCAS April 2018 Lecture - De Soto Slept Here, Not There

De Soto Slept Here, Not There: The Archaeology of Early Contact and Missions Sites in Northern Central Florida and the Making and Exposure of an Archaeological HoaxWillet A. Boyer III, Ph.D.Aucilla Research InstituteThe Marion County region of northern central Florida was the location of three of the Timucuan chiefdoms Ocale, Potano and Acuera, referred to in accounts of the Hernando de Soto entrada, as well as several seventeenth-century mission sites. Claims were made in the popular press in 2012 that the so-called "White Ranch Site", 8MR3538, in this region represented the early contact and mission-era site of Potano. Long-term research at the Hutto/Martin Site (8MR3447) and the Richardson Site (8AL100) has confirmed that these sites represent genuine early contact and mission sites, while archaeological study at the purported "White Ranch Site" revealed no precontact, early contact, or mission-era site ever existed there. The results of study at these and other sites will be presented, and avenues for future long-term research in this region discussed.

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 19 April 2018

Part Two

The Marion County region of northern central Florida was the location of three of the Timucuan chiefdoms Ocale, Potano and Acuera, referred to in accounts of the Hernando de Soto entrada, as well as several seventeenth-century mission sites. Claims were made in the popular press in 2012 that the so-called "White Ranch Site", 8MR3538, in this region represented the early contact and mission-era site of Potano. Long-term research at the Hutto/Martin Site (8MR3447) and the Richardson Site (8AL100) has confirmed that these sites represent genuine early contact and mission sites, while archaeological study at the purported "White Ranch Site" revealed no precontact, early contact, or mission-era site ever existed there. The results of study at these and other sites will be presented, and avenues for future long-term research in this region discussed.

FEBRUARY 2018

Dr. John R. Bratten of the University of West Florida


Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano’s Colony & Fleet

CGCAS/AWIARE February Lecture: Archaeology Lecture Series: Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano's Colony & Fleet

In 1559, a Spanish fleet sailed into Pensacola Bay, Florida, to found a colony. What would have been a self-sustaining and permanent colony in the present-day United States was destroyed almost as soon as it began when a powerful hurricane struck, sinking most of the ships and much of the colonists’ food supplies. In 1992, one of the ships of the lost fleet was discovered, a second was found in 2006, and a third in 2016. In 2015, the UWF archaeology program announced the finding of the Luna settlement land site. The investigation of the ships (dubbed Emanuel Point I, II, and III) and the settlement site by the University of West Florida’s Archaeology Program is revealing fascinating information about early Spanish colonization, seafaring, ship construction, and material culture. This is a multi-component project incorporating both terrestrial, underwater archaeology, and documents research as part of its overall research design, while incorporating a curriculum and training program for both undergraduate and graduate students.The featured speaker for this lecture will be Dr. John R. Bratten of the University of West Florida. This program is sponsored by the Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society, and the Alliance for Weedon Island Archaeological Research and Education.

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 15 February 2018

In 1559, a Spanish fleet sailed into Pensacola Bay, Florida, to found a colony. What would have been a self-sustaining and permanent colony in the present-day United States was destroyed almost as soon as it began when a powerful hurricane struck, sinking most of the ships and much of the colonists’ food supplies. In 1992, one of the ships of the lost fleet was discovered, a second was found in 2006, and a third in 2016. In 2015, the UWF archaeology program announced the finding of the Luna settlement land site.

The investigation of the ships (dubbed Emanuel Point I, II, and III) and the settlement site by the University of West Florida’s Archaeology Program is revealing fascinating information about early Spanish colonization, seafaring, ship construction, and material culture. This is a multi-component project incorporating both terrestrial, underwater archaeology, and documents research as part of its overall research design, while incorporating a curriculum and training program for both undergraduate and graduate students.

JANUARY 2018

Robert Sinibaldi Ph.D.


Vertebrate Fossils & Cultural Modification

CGCAS/AWIARE Lecture "Vertebrate Fossils & Cultural Modification" by Robert Sinibaldi Ph.D.

January 2018 CGCAS/AWIARE Lecture "Vertebrate Fossils & Cultural Modification" by Robert Sinibaldi Ph.D.The cultural modification of bones, antlers, and teeth by Paleoindians and those Native Americans that followed could constitute a book unto itself. Join the The Alliance for Weedon Island Archaeological Research and Education in cunjuction with the Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society for a presentation from Dr. Robert Sinibldi on the subjects of his latest book What Your Fossils Can Tell You: Vertebrate Morphology, Pathology, and Cultural Modification. As a rule of thumb many use the 10,000 year mark as a limit for what is fossilized and what is considered sub-fossil. Therefore in North America there is a short geological window where culturally modified items of bone, antler, and teeth could also be fossilized. Many of the items that will be presented might be considered sub-fossil – however, they could/should still represent culturally what could have existed during the Paleoindian time period.

Posted by Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society on Thursday, 18 January 2018

The cultural modification of bones, antlers, and teeth by Paleoindians and those Native Americans that followed could constitute a book unto itself. Join the The Alliance for Weedon Island Archaeological Research and Education in conjunction with the Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society for a presentation from Dr. Robert Sinibldi on the subjects of his latest book "What Your Fossils Can Tell You: Vertebrate Morphology, Pathology, and Cultural Modification".

As a rule of thumb many use the 10,000 year mark as a limit for what is fossilized and what is considered sub-fossil. Therefore in North America there is a short geological window where culturally modified items of bone, antler, and teeth could also be fossilized. Many of the items that will be presented might be considered sub-fossil – however, they could/should still represent culturally what could have existed during the Paleoindian time period.